Tag Archives: Canon EOS 1D-X mark II

Canon EOS 1D-X mark II Viewfinder

Hi All,

It’s pretty well publicized that the 1D-X mark II has always-on illuminated red AF points.  Are you curious what they actually look like?  Sure, plenty of websites show you a drawing and describe it, but I’ve actually got a photograph for you to see.  The image quality is terrible – I did this with my cell phone – but you can actually see what the interior viewfinder view of the camera is.

1D-x-mark-2-viewfinder-red-af-points

The red light is constant – it does not blink.  There is also a variety of other display options such as only showing the AF point that is selected.

The camera menu offers two brightness levels, “normal,” and “brighter.”

Canon 1D-x-mark-ii-af-point-brightness-menu

Canon EOS 1D-X mark II screen color balance

Note – The following information may no longer be relevant.  Canon has released firmware 1.1.2, which adds a menu item “LCD color tone.”  This menu allows you to choose the overall color tone of the screen for matching older camera bodies such as the 1D-X classic, or 5D mark III.  You can download the latest firmware for your 1D-X mark II here.

As of this post, I got my 1D-X mark II three days ago.  This thing is amazing.  I’m absolutely thrilled with the accuracy and consistency of the AF at large apertures (f/2.0 and faster) compared to my 1D-X original.

After receiving the new camera, I went into a two-day shoot, and I carried all three of my camera bodies – the 5D mark III, 1D-X original, and 1D-X mark II.  Immediately I noticed that the color balance of the screen in the 1D-X mark II is not the same as the other two cameras.  Forgive the cell phone photo, but here’s a sample of what I’m talking about:

Canon EOS 5D mark III screen vs 1D-X original screen vs 1D-X mark II screen. The 1DX mark II has a noticeably warmer color balance.

While slight variations from camera model to camera model are expected, notice that the 5D mark III and 1D-X original are still reasonably similar.  The 1D-X mark II, however, is significantly warmer in tone.

You’re looking at a photo of grey concrete.  This was shot near sunset, thus the slight magenta cast.  All three cameras were set to “cloudy” white balance.  All three versions were shot with the exact same lens.

I shoot RAW, so I wasn’t too concerned about being able to make everything match in post, but I was very curious to see whether that tone discrepancy was present in the files, or simple a function of the screen.  Here are slices of the same files from above.  These were output by Adobe Lightroom 6.  All files had all settings zero’d out, and the camera profile was set to Camera Neutral.  Again, allowing for slight changes in the different camera models, you can see that all files look pretty similar, which points pretty strongly to a simple difference in screens.

Difference in grey tones between Canon EOS 5Dmk3, 1D-X original, and 1D-X mark II.

One final way to test this, so to simply compare the screens while in a menu, not displaying image data.  This sample may be harder to judge from my cell phone photo, but in person the distinct warm-tone of the 1D-X mark II is quite clear.  (Sorry I changed the order of the cameras compared to the samples above.)

Canon EOS 5D mk III vs 1D-X original vs 1D-X mark II screen comparison in menus.

{Edit}
In addition to the above samples, I also used Adobe Lightroom to measure and level the three files.  I used the white balance tool to adjust the grey tone based on the exact same location in each photo.  The resulting output was:

  • 1D-X mark II: 5450k
  • 1D-X original: 5400k
  • 5D mark III: 5300K

Even further evidence that the files themselves are all reasonably close given completely different camera models and manufacturing years.

{End Edit}

Have you noticed this discrepancy in the screen of your own 1D-X mark II?  Does it impact your ability to shoot?  Would you not buy or choose to wait to buy because of this?  Comment below!