Tag Archives: 5d mk III

AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing) On the Canon 1D-X

If you’re familiar with the menu system on the Canon 5d mark III, you may know that on page two of the red section there’s a menu item called “Expo.comp./AEB.”  Using that menu, one can make changes to and enable/disable the way the camera exposure brackets.

Coming from that system, I was very puzzled attempting to enable auto exposure bracketing on Canon’s 1D-X.  Other than features that the 1D-X has over the 5d mk III, most of the menus are the same between the two cameras.  And yet the 1D-X is lacking that menu item entirely.  It turns out Canon implemented shortcuts via the hardware buttons on the 1D-X, and eliminated menu-digging.  It’s a very nice feature, but it’s not exactly self-explanatory.  Here’s how you get it working….
Continue reading AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing) On the Canon 1D-X

Canon 5d mark III Shutter Replacement

My 5d mk 3 finally crossed the 150,000 cycle mark on its shutter actuations, so I sent it off to Canon’s Irvine service center for replacement.  Do people go way past 150,000 actuations without any trouble?  Sure.  But people also go past 60,000 miles on their car without replacing the timing belt.  If you’re a casual photographer who doesn’t depend on your camera to pay bills, you may not care about the 150,000 actuation mark.  Might as well run the thing until it breaks down, and you actually have to pay the bill.  For me, the idea of my shutter jamming up in the middle of a wedding is the stuff nightmares are made of.  Sure I have other cameras, but why invite risk? Continue reading Canon 5d mark III Shutter Replacement

Canon EOS-1D X and 5D mk III, Single Point vs Single Point Spot AF

(If you find yourself wondering what the modes under discussion are, refer to the 1DX manual page 69, available for download here.  These exact same features are also available on the 5d mk III.)

I love the single point spot AF modes in Canon’s 5D mk III and 1D X cameras.  If you’re trying to get focus lock on a small point such as a burning candle, and the camera keeps focusing on the background instead of the flame, the spot AF mode can quickly solve this problem.  Another great use is if you’re trying to photograph a face framed by bushes or tree foliage.  In this case the camera often grabs focus on the surrounding leaves, rather than seeing through them to the face behind.  Spot AF can solve your troubles and keep you moving quickly to the next shot.

I liked them so much, in fact, that I started to leave the camera set to this mode all the time.

Then I began noticing a little less consistency when shooting in low light than I’d like, so I gave CPS a ring.  I’ll be going back to the normal single-point (non-spot) AF mode, thankyouverymuch.

The spot mode is great for the specific situations outlined above, but according to the CPS rep I spoke with, I’m also forcing the camera to attempt focus based on one quarter of the information available in the non-spot single-point mode.  This causes more hunting and less overall accuracy.  According to the rep, the spot AF mode was originally intended for macro photographers who routinely work at incredibly close distances.  Yes, it works great under the conditions I outlined above, but other than that it’s best to give the camera as much info as possible.

Canon EOS 5D Mark III vs EOS-1D X, Low Light / High ISO

{Note: Sorry about the bug in the commenting earlier.  It’s been fixed!}

I just unboxed my Canon EOS-1D X, and wanted to do a quick-n-dirty high ISO comparison.  In the process, I also discovered how very different the colors appear at the same white balance in Adobe Lightroom, and I thought I’d share the results with you. Continue reading Canon EOS 5D Mark III vs EOS-1D X, Low Light / High ISO

Canon 5d mark III | Record Separately Vs. Record to Multiple | Performance Comparison

UPDATE: 5/3/2013 if you’re using mRAW or sRAW in your workflow, check out my recent article to see if you’re actually saving yourself hard drive space.

UPDATED 4/3/2012 to add metric for mRAW to CF, sRAW to SD.


I am in love with my new Canon 5d3.  A huge sigh of relief for me is the dual card slots, so I can always have a backup.  Unfortunately there’s a big performance difference between the SD card slot and the CF card slot.

If Canon had chosen to support the UHS-1 standard, we’d get roughly equal performance.  As it is, they supported SDXC, but not UHS-1.  (For the record, the camera will work with a UHS-1 card, it just won’t support the improved write speeds.  I’m using one in my camera and it works fine.) Continue reading Canon 5d mark III | Record Separately Vs. Record to Multiple | Performance Comparison