Tag Archives: 1D X

How To Change or Remove the Canon EOS 1D-X Clock / Backup Battery

You know about the big battery in your Canon 1D-X, but did you know all modern cameras also have a small watch battery that keeps the clock and other settings  while the main battery is removed?

While it typically would take many years, sometimes this battery goes dead, causing your camera to lose all its settings while the main battery is out and charging.  Or perhaps you’ve had some kind of technical issue with your camera for which doing a full factory reset would be useful.

** WARNING: IF IT’S NOT ALREADY OBVIOUS, DOING THIS WILL COMPLETELY ELIMINATE ALL CUSTOMIZATIONS AND SETTINGS FROM YOUR CAMERA.  USE THE 1DX’S ABILITY TO BACK THEM UP TO A FILE BEFORE PERFORMING THIS OPERATION. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS AT YOUR OWN RISK. **

Edit to above warning – So that’s not true.  Previous 1D series cameras will lose all settings, but the 1D-X stores many of the settings in flash memory, so they persist even after pulling the backup battery.  To reset back to factory, you’ll also need to visit two menus.  The first is the yellow Wrench menu, page 4, then select “Clear all camera settings.”  This poorly named menu item clears some camera settings.  The next place to visit is the orange Camera menu page 7, and select “Clear all Custom Func.”  These two menu items plus removing the backup battery will put the camera back to factory.

Here are the steps to remove your 1D-X’s backup battery.  The only tool you’ll need is a PH00 or Philips-head 00 size screwdriver.  If you need to replace the battery, look for a 3V CR2025.

The first step to replacing the backup / clock battery in the Canon 1D-X, is to remove the main battery.
The first step to replacing the backup / clock battery in the Canon 1D-X, is to remove the main battery.
The first step to replacing the backup / clock battery in the Canon 1D-X, is to remove the main battery.
Turn the camera upside down.

Continue reading How To Change or Remove the Canon EOS 1D-X Clock / Backup Battery

AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing) On the Canon 1D-X

If you’re familiar with the menu system on the Canon 5d mark III, you may know that on page two of the red section there’s a menu item called “Expo.comp./AEB.”  Using that menu, one can make changes to and enable/disable the way the camera exposure brackets.

Coming from that system, I was very puzzled attempting to enable auto exposure bracketing on Canon’s 1D-X.  Other than features that the 1D-X has over the 5d mk III, most of the menus are the same between the two cameras.  And yet the 1D-X is lacking that menu item entirely.  It turns out Canon implemented shortcuts via the hardware buttons on the 1D-X, and eliminated menu-digging.  It’s a very nice feature, but it’s not exactly self-explanatory.  Here’s how you get it working….
Continue reading AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing) On the Canon 1D-X

Canon EOS-1D X and 5D mk III, Single Point vs Single Point Spot AF

(If you find yourself wondering what the modes under discussion are, refer to the 1DX manual page 69, available for download here.  These exact same features are also available on the 5d mk III.)

I love the single point spot AF modes in Canon’s 5D mk III and 1D X cameras.  If you’re trying to get focus lock on a small point such as a burning candle, and the camera keeps focusing on the background instead of the flame, the spot AF mode can quickly solve this problem.  Another great use is if you’re trying to photograph a face framed by bushes or tree foliage.  In this case the camera often grabs focus on the surrounding leaves, rather than seeing through them to the face behind.  Spot AF can solve your troubles and keep you moving quickly to the next shot.

I liked them so much, in fact, that I started to leave the camera set to this mode all the time.

Then I began noticing a little less consistency when shooting in low light than I’d like, so I gave CPS a ring.  I’ll be going back to the normal single-point (non-spot) AF mode, thankyouverymuch.

The spot mode is great for the specific situations outlined above, but according to the CPS rep I spoke with, I’m also forcing the camera to attempt focus based on one quarter of the information available in the non-spot single-point mode.  This causes more hunting and less overall accuracy.  According to the rep, the spot AF mode was originally intended for macro photographers who routinely work at incredibly close distances.  Yes, it works great under the conditions I outlined above, but other than that it’s best to give the camera as much info as possible.

Canon EOS 5D Mark III vs EOS-1D X, Low Light / High ISO

{Note: Sorry about the bug in the commenting earlier.  It’s been fixed!}

I just unboxed my Canon EOS-1D X, and wanted to do a quick-n-dirty high ISO comparison.  In the process, I also discovered how very different the colors appear at the same white balance in Adobe Lightroom, and I thought I’d share the results with you. Continue reading Canon EOS 5D Mark III vs EOS-1D X, Low Light / High ISO