Windows 10 on Yosemite Boot Camp

I just finished installing the Windows 10 upgrade on my bootcamped Late 2013 13″ retina Macbook Pro, and the good news is that there are only a few things to report.

First off, yes, Win10 starts up very, very fast.

Further, so far I haven’t encountered any major applications that won’t work.  For me that means Photo Mechanic 4.6.9, Lightroom CC 2015.1.1, my Spyder 4 Elite utility, Word 2013, and all of my little utilities ported straight over without any fuss.

Windows 10 is being trickled out to most users via Windows Update, which means that if you’re excited to try the new OS, you might not get it as quickly as you’d like.  Never fear, there’s a way to force the update whenever you’re ready.  Simply visit Microsoft’s “Download Windows 10” page, and grab the download tool.  Some of the wording implies that it’s only for making physical media, but it will actually support either this or an upgrade installation. Continue reading Windows 10 on Yosemite Boot Camp

How To Set Up A Rotating Backup

When it comes to consulting for photographers, backup systems are one of the things I’m passionate about.  The double-whammy fear of technical complexity and expense keeps a lot of photographers from getting it right.

This is a companion article to my previous post, “RAID Won’t Save Your Ass.”  If you haven’t read that yet, go do so now.  It’s important for setting up your on-site backups.

A rotating backup takes care of your offsite needs.  You need offsite backup, because a fire or a thief will completely wipe out that backup safety blanket you’ve so carefully constructed.   Continue reading How To Set Up A Rotating Backup

PaletteGear Beta Testing with Adobe Lightroom

I’ve been beta testing PaletteGear hardware controls for Lightroom 6 / CC 2015 for the last four or five months.  Over that time, I’ve gone from a blend of cautiously excited, to frustrated, to delighted, to surprised at how much I’ve come to depend on it.  My present relationship with the hardware is something like, using it far more than I ever imagined, and simultaneously wanting it to do even more.

Before I get too deep, I should clarify that this is not to be taken as a review.  The software is still in beta, so that’s one good reason to anticipate that lots more will be coming.  In addition, the good folks at PaletteGear selected me because of my involvement with Adobe Lightroom beta.  They needed someone who was running LR6/CC2015 well before public release so I could get involved early in the beta process.  Beta testing of this nature is time consuming, especially when it comes to feature feedback and bug reports.  Given the time investment, PaletteGear invited me to keep the hardware they sent.  It’s a fair and respectful trade, but it also means I cannot be unbiased in a purely journalistic sense.  Please keep that in mind as you read this.  I will focus more on how I’ve come to use the controls with Lightroom, and avoid making any recommendations whether you should purchase it.

I am a Lightroom expert.  I use keyboard shortcuts as my primary means of navigating the application, and I am fast and proficient at it.  This is why I was initially cautious in my enthusiasm for PaletteGear.  On one hand, given LR’s lack of native keyboard controls for Develop operations, it could be pretty cool.  On the other hand, if it didn’t gracefully handle those operations, and just ended up being a replacement for keyboard shortcuts that already existed, then it would end up being an expensive gimmick.

The hardware really does snap together however you like.  The clever use of magnets makes it simple.  You can’t switch your brain off completely, because like legos, there’s an input side and an output side.  Input can happen on three sides of a square module, and output happens only on one side.  You’ll need to rotate the modules into the correct orientation so the signal flows through the system, but it’s simple enough to understand when you see it.  You can pull it apart and snap it together on the fly, while it’s powered up, and the software responds admirably to changes in the configuration.  If you pull a module off when it was assigned a function and a custom color, when you re-attach it in a different configuration it retains that function and custom color. Here’s a quick demo:

Continue reading PaletteGear Beta Testing with Adobe Lightroom