Canon 5D Mark IV Announcement Coming Soon

According to Canon Rumors, the Canon 5D Mark IV will be announced on August 25, 2016.  CR has indicated that they’re confident this is fact, not rumor.

Continue reading Canon 5D Mark IV Announcement Coming Soon

Canon EOS 1D-X mark II Viewfinder

Hi All,

It’s pretty well publicized that the 1D-X mark II has always-on illuminated red AF points.  Are you curious what they actually look like?  Sure, plenty of websites show you a drawing and describe it, but I’ve actually got a photograph for you to see.  The image quality is terrible – I did this with my cell phone – but you can actually see what the interior viewfinder view of the camera is.

1D-x-mark-2-viewfinder-red-af-points

The red light is constant – it does not blink.  There is also a variety of other display options such as only showing the AF point that is selected.

The camera menu offers two brightness levels, “normal,” and “brighter.”

Canon 1D-x-mark-ii-af-point-brightness-menu

Canon EOS 1D-X mark II screen color balance

Note – The following information may no longer be relevant.  Canon has released firmware 1.1.2, which adds a menu item “LCD color tone.”  This menu allows you to choose the overall color tone of the screen for matching older camera bodies such as the 1D-X classic, or 5D mark III.  You can download the latest firmware for your 1D-X mark II here.

As of this post, I got my 1D-X mark II three days ago.  This thing is amazing.  I’m absolutely thrilled with the accuracy and consistency of the AF at large apertures (f/2.0 and faster) compared to my 1D-X original.

After receiving the new camera, I went into a two-day shoot, and I carried all three of my camera bodies – the 5D mark III, 1D-X original, and 1D-X mark II.  Immediately I noticed that the color balance of the screen in the 1D-X mark II is not the same as the other two cameras.  Forgive the cell phone photo, but here’s a sample of what I’m talking about:

Canon EOS 5D mark III screen vs 1D-X original screen vs 1D-X mark II screen. The 1DX mark II has a noticeably warmer color balance.

While slight variations from camera model to camera model are expected, notice that the 5D mark III and 1D-X original are still reasonably similar.  The 1D-X mark II, however, is significantly warmer in tone.

You’re looking at a photo of grey concrete.  This was shot near sunset, thus the slight magenta cast.  All three cameras were set to “cloudy” white balance.  All three versions were shot with the exact same lens.

I shoot RAW, so I wasn’t too concerned about being able to make everything match in post, but I was very curious to see whether that tone discrepancy was present in the files, or simple a function of the screen.  Here are slices of the same files from above.  These were output by Adobe Lightroom 6.  All files had all settings zero’d out, and the camera profile was set to Camera Neutral.  Again, allowing for slight changes in the different camera models, you can see that all files look pretty similar, which points pretty strongly to a simple difference in screens.

Difference in grey tones between Canon EOS 5Dmk3, 1D-X original, and 1D-X mark II.

One final way to test this, so to simply compare the screens while in a menu, not displaying image data.  This sample may be harder to judge from my cell phone photo, but in person the distinct warm-tone of the 1D-X mark II is quite clear.  (Sorry I changed the order of the cameras compared to the samples above.)

Canon EOS 5D mk III vs 1D-X original vs 1D-X mark II screen comparison in menus.

{Edit}
In addition to the above samples, I also used Adobe Lightroom to measure and level the three files.  I used the white balance tool to adjust the grey tone based on the exact same location in each photo.  The resulting output was:

  • 1D-X mark II: 5450k
  • 1D-X original: 5400k
  • 5D mark III: 5300K

Even further evidence that the files themselves are all reasonably close given completely different camera models and manufacturing years.

{End Edit}

Have you noticed this discrepancy in the screen of your own 1D-X mark II?  Does it impact your ability to shoot?  Would you not buy or choose to wait to buy because of this?  Comment below!

Does the new EOS 1D-X mark II battery charger also charge the older 1D-X (original) batteries?

Yes…

Photo of Canon's LC-E19 charger charging both LP-E19 and LP-E4N battery packs.

Yes it does.

To clarify, the battery new battery charger provided with the Canon EOS 1D-X mark II is the LC-E19.  The native battery for the same camera is now the LP-E19.  The camera can also be used with the previous batteries from the original 1D-X called the LP-E4N.  The new charger is backward compatible with the older battery packs, and will charge them.

Windows 10 Multiple Desktop Keyboard Shortcuts

While many of you are probably exclusively Mac users, there are many of us on the Windows platform.  If you’ve made the jump to Windows 10, and haven’t yet explored the multiple desktops feature, I recommend you do so.

Multiple desktops are great for staying organized when you’re juggling a lot of projects.  I can have one for all my email and social media windows, another for Lightroom and image processing, and yet another for InDesign and Bridge where I’m working on an album design.

Continue reading Windows 10 Multiple Desktop Keyboard Shortcuts

How To Change or Remove the Canon EOS 1D-X Clock / Backup Battery

You know about the big battery in your Canon 1D-X, but did you know all modern cameras also have a small watch battery that keeps the clock and other settings  while the main battery is removed?

While it typically would take many years, sometimes this battery goes dead, causing your camera to lose all its settings while the main battery is out and charging.  Or perhaps you’ve had some kind of technical issue with your camera for which doing a full factory reset would be useful.

** WARNING: IF IT’S NOT ALREADY OBVIOUS, DOING THIS WILL COMPLETELY ELIMINATE ALL CUSTOMIZATIONS AND SETTINGS FROM YOUR CAMERA.  USE THE 1DX’S ABILITY TO BACK THEM UP TO A FILE BEFORE PERFORMING THIS OPERATION. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS AT YOUR OWN RISK. **

Edit to above warning – So that’s not true.  Previous 1D series cameras will lose all settings, but the 1D-X stores many of the settings in flash memory, so they persist even after pulling the backup battery.  To reset back to factory, you’ll also need to visit two menus.  The first is the yellow Wrench menu, page 4, then select “Clear all camera settings.”  This poorly named menu item clears some camera settings.  The next place to visit is the orange Camera menu page 7, and select “Clear all Custom Func.”  These two menu items plus removing the backup battery will put the camera back to factory.

Here are the steps to remove your 1D-X’s backup battery.  The only tool you’ll need is a PH00 or Philips-head 00 size screwdriver.  If you need to replace the battery, look for a 3V CR2025.

The first step to replacing the backup / clock battery in the Canon 1D-X, is to remove the main battery.
The first step to replacing the backup / clock battery in the Canon 1D-X, is to remove the main battery.
The first step to replacing the backup / clock battery in the Canon 1D-X, is to remove the main battery.
Turn the camera upside down.

Continue reading How To Change or Remove the Canon EOS 1D-X Clock / Backup Battery

Workshop Launch

  • Better image quality in the same or less time.
  • How to build the most effective backup systems and keep them affordable.
  • Solutions for challenging post-processing situations, dealing with mixed light, and other deep Lightroom develop module tools.

ProTogTech is launching it’s first ever workflow and backup systems workshop in San Francisco on August 27th!  Come join the fun and learn a lot.  Details at http://protogtech.com/workflow-backup-for-photographers-beta-workshop-2015/

Windows 10 on Yosemite Boot Camp

I just finished installing the Windows 10 upgrade on my bootcamped Late 2013 13″ retina Macbook Pro, and the good news is that there are only a few things to report.

First off, yes, Win10 starts up very, very fast.

Further, so far I haven’t encountered any major applications that won’t work.  For me that means Photo Mechanic 4.6.9, Lightroom CC 2015.1.1, my Spyder 4 Elite utility, Word 2013, and all of my little utilities ported straight over without any fuss.

Windows 10 is being trickled out to most users via Windows Update, which means that if you’re excited to try the new OS, you might not get it as quickly as you’d like.  Never fear, there’s a way to force the update whenever you’re ready.  Simply visit Microsoft’s “Download Windows 10” page, and grab the download tool.  Some of the wording implies that it’s only for making physical media, but it will actually support either this or an upgrade installation. Continue reading Windows 10 on Yosemite Boot Camp

How To Set Up A Rotating Backup

When it comes to consulting for photographers, backup systems are one of the things I’m passionate about.  The double-whammy fear of technical complexity and expense keeps a lot of photographers from getting it right.

This is a companion article to my previous post, “RAID Won’t Save Your Ass.”  If you haven’t read that yet, go do so now.  It’s important for setting up your on-site backups.

A rotating backup takes care of your offsite needs.  You need offsite backup, because a fire or a thief will completely wipe out that backup safety blanket you’ve so carefully constructed.   Continue reading How To Set Up A Rotating Backup

PaletteGear Beta Testing with Adobe Lightroom

I’ve been beta testing PaletteGear hardware controls for Lightroom 6 / CC 2015 for the last four or five months.  Over that time, I’ve gone from a blend of cautiously excited, to frustrated, to delighted, to surprised at how much I’ve come to depend on it.  My present relationship with the hardware is something like, using it far more than I ever imagined, and simultaneously wanting it to do even more.

Before I get too deep, I should clarify that this is not to be taken as a review.  The software is still in beta, so that’s one good reason to anticipate that lots more will be coming.  In addition, the good folks at PaletteGear selected me because of my involvement with Adobe Lightroom beta.  They needed someone who was running LR6/CC2015 well before public release so I could get involved early in the beta process.  Beta testing of this nature is time consuming, especially when it comes to feature feedback and bug reports.  Given the time investment, PaletteGear invited me to keep the hardware they sent.  It’s a fair and respectful trade, but it also means I cannot be unbiased in a purely journalistic sense.  Please keep that in mind as you read this.  I will focus more on how I’ve come to use the controls with Lightroom, and avoid making any recommendations whether you should purchase it.

I am a Lightroom expert.  I use keyboard shortcuts as my primary means of navigating the application, and I am fast and proficient at it.  This is why I was initially cautious in my enthusiasm for PaletteGear.  On one hand, given LR’s lack of native keyboard controls for Develop operations, it could be pretty cool.  On the other hand, if it didn’t gracefully handle those operations, and just ended up being a replacement for keyboard shortcuts that already existed, then it would end up being an expensive gimmick.

The hardware really does snap together however you like.  The clever use of magnets makes it simple.  You can’t switch your brain off completely, because like legos, there’s an input side and an output side.  Input can happen on three sides of a square module, and output happens only on one side.  You’ll need to rotate the modules into the correct orientation so the signal flows through the system, but it’s simple enough to understand when you see it.  You can pull it apart and snap it together on the fly, while it’s powered up, and the software responds admirably to changes in the configuration.  If you pull a module off when it was assigned a function and a custom color, when you re-attach it in a different configuration it retains that function and custom color. Here’s a quick demo:

Continue reading PaletteGear Beta Testing with Adobe Lightroom

Technology & Workflow for Busy Photographers

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